howtoskinatiger:

mouthwingss:

Hero

Most certainly NOT a hero. When you release captive animals into the wild you are not saving them, you are causing them to suffer and die slow, miserable deaths. Releasing these animals is simply an ego boost to people who want to pretend they’re helping animals when in reality they’re only harming them. 

This is what happens when mink are released from fur farms;

These mink cannot survive in the wild. They have no idea how to hunt, how to avoid danger, how to find shelter or anything, so they either get hit by cars, starve to death, die from the elements or attacked by other animals. Mink are also extremely aggressive towards others of their species and releasing so many into one area inevitably results in a mink hunger games, where they will attack and kill each other. Physically, they are also far too removed from their wild cousins to do well in the wild. Farmed mink are much larger and heavier, with colors that put them at a huge disadvantage and a coat that isn’t as weather or waterproof as wild mink.

Released mink are also extremely damaging to the environment. The few that do survive become ruthless predators and push native species into extinction. In the UK the water vole is facing extinction purely because of mink released from fur farms. In some places they also compete with the native, wild mink, as well as other native predators, taking away vital space and food from them. 

Don’t pretend this kind of thing helps animals because it most certainly does not. 

skelelegs:

What kind of dove is this? It’s a young animal and isn’t 100% feathered out.

Looks like a Eurasian collared dove

08.21.14 ♥ 4

theexoticvet:

There is a very interesting article published in the July issue of the Journal of Exotic Pet Medicine. It is (as far as I know) the first scientific study done on Spider morph ball pythons.

The article is far too in depth to include here but they did conclude that “Although further research is necessary for improved understanding, there is clear potential for significant welfare compromises to result from artificial breeding selection of reptiles.”

For those interested:

Rose, Mark P., BSc, MSc, CBiol, MSB, and David L. Williams, Ma, VetMD, PhD, CertVOphthal, CertWEL, FHEA, FSB, FRCVS. “Neurological Dysfunction in a Ball Python (Python Regius) Colour Morph and Implications for Welfare.” Journal of Exotic Pet Medicine 23.3 (2014): 234-39. Print.

Do you know of any way to obtain a online copy? I’d be very interested in reading the article!

08.21.14 ♥ 21

cool-critters:

Red river hog (Potamochoerus porcus)

The red river hog is a wild member of the pig family living in Africa, with most of its distribution in the Guinean and Congolian forests. It is rarely seen away from rainforests, and generally prefers areas near rivers or swamps. Red river hogs eat grasses, berries, roots, insects, molluscs, small vertebrates and carrion. They typically live in herds of six to 20 members led by a dominant boar, with sows rearing three to six piglets at a time. Red river hogs are mostly nocturnal; by day, they hide in dense brush; after sunset, they roam in troops searching for food. They are good swimmers, but are unable to hold their breath for long.

photo credits: link, EPA, National Geographic

My favourite porcine <3

crazycapybara:

National Zoo’s Baby Giant Anteater by Meghan Murphy/Smithsonian’s National Zoo.

Camera: Canon EOS 5D Mark II
Aperture: f/22
Exposure: 1/100th
Focal Length: 100mm
Exif Data Zoom ponderation:

Cheyenne River Valley by Bonny Fleming  (South Dakota, US)

ponderation:

Cheyenne River Valley by Bonny Fleming  (South Dakota, US)

08.21.14 ♥ 2553

fastcompany:

Ka-Pow: Watch These Fish Cannons Shoot Salmon Safely Over Dams

Salmon have serious swimming skills—some travel thousands of miles to return to their original homes to breed. But even though they can jump as high as 12 feet in the air, they can’t manage to get over massive concrete dams that we have built to block their journeys back to their homes. Now one new idea could give them a boost. The plan involves whisking the fish through a long vacuum tube at speeds up to 22 miles per hour and then shooting them out the other end like a cannon.

Read More>

…. what

08.21.14 ♥ 9288
Camera: Nikon D4
Aperture: f/2.8
Exposure: 1/1000th
Focal Length: 110mm
Exif Data Zoom llbwwb:


(via 500px / Summer Monarch by Max Ellis)
08.21.14 ♥ 341

fuckyeahungulates:

Fallow Deer (Dama dama)

08.20.14 ♥ 331

curtisplease:

dimedog:

look at this fucked up bird

image

what the fuck

it’s a sage-grouse!

don’t act like you don’t want to be reincarnated into a pointy-tailed bird with bouncy yellow neck titties 

08.20.14 ♥ 28951
Camera: Panasonic DMC-TZ4
Aperture: f/4.7
Exposure: 1/30th
Focal Length: 16mm
Exif Data Zoom europewilds:

treizquatorz:

Is what I just read true, that wild boars are extinct in Britain? That’s crazy, there’s so many boars in France, like when I go in Chambord forest 10 km from my home, I see loads of them (like the one on the picture, who was just walking on the side of the road). And in Brittany, farmers have to kill them because they eat everything in the corn fields.
(sorry, this was a wild boar minute)

Wild board were extinct in Britain until very recently.
Boar became extinct in Britain in the 13th century, and although various attempts were made to bring to back, it wasn’t until the 1990’s that they became reestablished after a large number of boars escaped or were released from farms by animal activists. Their numbers are now so high in some areas that a cull has been proposed!
Here’s some more information of the extinction and subsequent return of the wild boar in Britain. 

europewilds:

treizquatorz:

Is what I just read true, that wild boars are extinct in Britain? That’s crazy, there’s so many boars in France, like when I go in Chambord forest 10 km from my home, I see loads of them (like the one on the picture, who was just walking on the side of the road). And in Brittany, farmers have to kill them because they eat everything in the corn fields.

(sorry, this was a wild boar minute)

Wild board were extinct in Britain until very recently.

Boar became extinct in Britain in the 13th century, and although various attempts were made to bring to back, it wasn’t until the 1990’s that they became reestablished after a large number of boars escaped or were released from farms by animal activists. Their numbers are now so high in some areas that a cull has been proposed!

Here’s some more information of the extinction and subsequent return of the wild boar in Britain. 

sigilsjunk:

martyrized:

sigilsjunk

NICE RACK woahhh

photoshopped
08.20.14 ♥ 5089

canidcompendium:

Little fox, big problem

The European or red fox – Vulpes vulpes – is a handsome animal. It has a pointed muzzle, auburn coat and bushy tail. In Quentin Blake’s famous illustrations for Roald Dahl’s Fantastic Mr Fox, the titular mammal wears a waistcoat.

But they are one of the most invasive species we’ve got. Foxes are considered a threat to 76 kinds of native birds, mammals, reptiles and amphibians, including the critically endangered orange-bellied parrot, spotted quail-thrush and western swamp tortoise.

"The fox and the cat, between them, have been responsible for the decline and extinction of many species of native mammals," van der Ree says.

Search the internet for foxes in Melbourne and you’ll see the city declared “the fox capital of the western world” on the authority of the RSPCA, no less. Contacted by Fairfax Media this week, the RSPCA could not confirm it had ever made such a claim.

In fact, we can’t be sure how many foxes there are in the state. The last estimate came from CSIRO research in the early 1990s.

John Matthews, from the Department of Environment and Primary Industry, says there’s no reason to think numbers have changed significantly. But there are more than you think: in country Victoria, foxes number between 1 and 4 per square kilometre. But in the city, where the living is easy, there are four times as many.

Around the wharves and wastelands of Port Melbourne, the vulpine population is at its peak: as many as 20 foxes prowl every square kilometre.

Read more

08.20.14 ♥ 25