Posts tagged rat.

scum-manifesta:

i know a lot of my friends don’t understand why i care so much about taking pictures of my rats

i guess i don’t either, truthfully

but i know that in a few years when i don’t have audrey in my life anymore, i’m going to be really grateful i was able to capture all those mundane-but-still-inexplicably-special moments, like audrey peeking out my boyfriend’s shirt while he does work

I’m still sorry I took so few photos of my rats Bubble & Squeak. They’ll just have to live on in my memory

roseofrodents:

The gang by Feistea on Flickr.

sarahsratties:

The boys have a new cage that they love! I’m going to start making heaps more hammocks for the rats since it’s starting to slowly cool down enough that they want them again :)

trainingisteaching:

Amazing, beautiful, and SO CUTE. I love it when people train not-usually-trained-animals, and show how amazing they are! 

I’m literally making inhumane noises right now. I can’t handle the cute.

01.07.14 ♥ 69927

rapps:

Oh my goood look at this adorable little sleepy head ;3;

10.25.13 ♥ 14990

morelia-viridis:

petermorwood:

tedx:

Rats on patrol — rodents that detect landmines and tuberculosis

As a kid, Bart Weetjens was rather fond of his pet rats. Where other people saw mangy rodents, he saw potential. These oft-feared mammals can be more than just subway chasers and gourmet French chefs (Ratatouille, anyone?): in fact, rats can save lives.

Weetjens grew up to help establish APOPO, an NGO that employs African Giant Pouched Rats to detect landmines and tuberculosis. Using these rats is an affordable, inventive solution to blights that plague some of the world’s poorest countries.

Rats have more genetic material allocated to smell than any other mammal on earth. Weetjens trains them to scratch at a surface when they discover a particular smell, such as explosive materials or TB-positive sputum samples. Turns out, they’re much more effective than standard detection technologies. In standard landmine detection, four people with metal detectors can clear about 200 square meters of land every day. A rat with one trainer can clear the same amount of land in only half an hour.

They’re impressively good at screening for tuberculosis as well. A lab technician can correctly identify about 50 percent of TB-positive samples with a microscope, but adding a rat to that process bumps up the rate to 67 percent or more. Plus, they’ll work for peanuts and stay focused for hours at a time.

See how Weetjens came up with this innovation, and see his rats in action in his talk from TEDxBratislava below:

Yet another example of “you rat!” being a compliment… :-)

Yes yes yes. APOPO gets a small donation from me monthly. Go check them out if you don’t know about them already!

10.12.13 ♥ 1108

nikaiba:

Very cute x

09.15.13 ♥ 1206
08.17.13 ♥ 2478

lepidopterist1Painted tree rat (Callistomys pictus)

The painted tree rat is a species of spiny rat endemic to Eastern Brazil. It is the only species in its genus Callistomys and is a species of spiny rat.

The painted tree rat grows to 30cm long and is one of the larger species of spiny rat. It has white fur with a glossy black cap back and band to outs forelimbs. Its fur is long, dense and corse but not spiny as in other species of its family.

The population of the painted tree rat is severely fragmented due to a continued decline of habitat. Little is known of its natural diet and ecology but today it has been found in caoca plantations consuming the leaves of these plants.

Painted tree rats are classified as endangered on the IUCN red list.

Source IUCN http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/6985/0

Photo credit Marcos Sousa

unknown-endangered: Malagasy giant rat (Hypogeomys antimena)

Endangered on the IUCN Red List.
Having been isolated on Madagascar for so long, Hypogeomys antimena is more like a rabbit than a rat. It has elongated ears and powerful hind legs and feet that allow it to leap almost a metre high, which it does to escape predators. It lives in a network of tunnels, which are occupied by a family group consisting of a monogamous pair and their offspring. Males are believed to provide much of the parental care in order to prevent high infant predation. Although mainly herbivorous, this species has been observed feeding on invertebrates in captivity. 
Habitat loss, illegal deforestation, and invasive species have all contributed to the decline of H. antimena. The burning of vegetation for charcoal or agriculture cause forests to be replaced by dense undergrowth, which is unsuitable for giant rats. 
The Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust and the Madagascan government are working to set up a captive breeding programme. They are also helping local people to protect H. antimena. As yet, the Menabe Forest, where this species is found, has only temporary protected status, and a full protected status is needed to ensure the survival of this species.

unknown-endangeredMalagasy giant rat (Hypogeomys antimena)

Endangered on the IUCN Red List.

Having been isolated on Madagascar for so long, Hypogeomys antimena is more like a rabbit than a rat. It has elongated ears and powerful hind legs and feet that allow it to leap almost a metre high, which it does to escape predators. It lives in a network of tunnels, which are occupied by a family group consisting of a monogamous pair and their offspring. Males are believed to provide much of the parental care in order to prevent high infant predation. Although mainly herbivorous, this species has been observed feeding on invertebrates in captivity. 

Habitat loss, illegal deforestation, and invasive species have all contributed to the decline of H. antimena. The burning of vegetation for charcoal or agriculture cause forests to be replaced by dense undergrowth, which is unsuitable for giant rats. 

The Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust and the Madagascan government are working to set up a captive breeding programme. They are also helping local people to protect H. antimena. As yet, the Menabe Forest, where this species is found, has only temporary protected status, and a full protected status is needed to ensure the survival of this species.

07.21.13 ♥ 30

ratofthelab:

Rats of yesteryear appreciation post - Balrog

06.30.13 ♥ 152

blackyote:

crazycritterlife:

Tani, you were the most destructive rat I’ve ever owned and you wrecked a lot of my things, but I wouldn’t have had you any other way. You were Tani, the brat, with your sisters, Kiki, the sweetheart, and Tara, the criminal mastermind. Together, you made the best group of rats I’ve ever had. Go rest in peace with your sister. I know Tara is going to be lonely without you two, but eventually you’ll all be a trio again

Tani was the cutest thing ever.  I’m sorry for your loss.  :(

:(